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From The New York Times

The Learning Network: Word of the Day | crescendo

This word has appeared in 82 New York Times articles in the past year.






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Burdened With Debt, Law School Graduates Struggle in Job Market

About 20 percent of 2010 graduates have jobs that do not require a law license, a new study shows, and only 40 percent are working in law firms.






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Turning a Children’s Rating System Into an Advocacy Army

James Steyer’s nonprofit organization, Common Sense Media, is known for offering parents guidance on games and videos, but he has a grander vision.






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National Briefing | South: Florida: Hazing Case Ends With Convictions of Last Defendants

The last three defendants were convicted of manslaughter and hazing in the death of a Florida A&M drum major, ending a three-year-old case.






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A Contest in the Bronx Helps Young Scientists Explore

Bronx SciFest, a competition created by Lehman College three years ago, gives students who might not otherwise get to a chance to pursue serious research.






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National Briefing | South: Florida: Fraternity Expels 3 After Abuse of Veterans

A University of Florida fraternity expelled three of its members Friday after allegations that they hurled insults and spat at a group of disabled military veterans at a Panama City resort.






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Bill Clinton Ends Role With Chain of For-Profit Colleges

The former president left his position as honorary chancellor for Laureate International Universities, part of a for-profit college industry that has drawn criticism over its students’ debt loads.






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Your Money Adviser: How to Appeal College Financial Aid Offers

A student’s true financial status isn’t always reflected in an aid application, which is why an appeal can often persuade a college to give more.

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Your Money: Navigating the Thickets of Student Loan Counseling

Studies show that the required counseling given to incoming college students often is dense, confusing and completed at the busiest time of the year.






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Higher Education: College for the Masses

New studies show how a four-year degree greatly benefits even marginal students.

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The Learning Network: Test Yourself | Holly Taylor and Teenage Fame

Here are several paragraphs from an April 20 article, “On ‘The Americans,’ Holly Taylor Plays a 15-Year-Old Whose ‘Whole Life Is a Lie.’ ” Can you choose the best word or phrase for each blank?






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The Learning Network: Have You Been To Parties That Have Gotten Out of Control?

A Times article looks at some recent examples of parties that grew so big and unruly, perhaps because of social media publicity, that they become dangerously out-of-control. Have you ever been to a party like this? What, if anything, do you think officials should do to keep them safe — or prevent them from happening at all?






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The Learning Network: Editorial Contest Winner | Does Equal Opportunity Really Exist in America?

An essay by William N., one of the Top 10 winners of our Student Editorial Contest.






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The Learning Network: 6 Q’s About the News | 2 Qaeda Hostages Were Accidentally Killed in U.S. Strike, White House Says

Do you think the United States should continue to use unmanned drones to attack enemy fighters? Why?






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The Learning Network: Word of the Day | decant

This word has appeared in four New York Times articles in the past year.






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Accused of Rape, a Student Sues Columbia Over Bias

Paul Nungesser said the university actively supported a public harassment campaign against him by his accuser, Emma Sulkowicz, who drew national attention when she carried a mattress around campus.






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Advocates Sue a New York School District, Claiming Weak Programs for Refugees

The New York Civil Liberties Union filed suit on behalf of six refugees in the Utica City district. Law enforcement agencies have pressed New York schools for months to ease enrollment for immigrants.






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School Leadership Meetings Are Open to the Public, Judge Says

Every public school in New York City is required to have a School Leadership Team, made up of a mix of faculty and parents, including the principal and the chapter leader of the teachers’ union.






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Only Alternative for Some Students Sitting Out Standardized Tests: Do Nothing

The anti-testing movement is targeting districts that require students not taking the exams to remain quietly in their classrooms and, as opt-out advocates have labeled it, “sit and stare.”






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The Learning Network: Throwback Thursday | Yankee Stadium, the Loch Ness Monster, Coney Island, Postal Cats and More

A collection of articles featured on the @NYTarchives Twitter feed this week — and an invitation to our readers to find and suggest some interesting pieces of their own.






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